Mass-Storage Structure

References:

  1. Abraham Silberschatz, Greg Gagne, and Peter Baer Galvin, "Operating System Concepts, Eighth Edition ", Chapter 12

12.1 Overview of Mass-Storage Structure

12.1.1 Magnetic Disks

12.1.2 Magnetic Tapes

12.2 Disk Structure

12.3 Disk Attachment

Disk drives can be attached either directly to a particular host ( a local disk ) or to a network.

12.3.1 Host-Attached Storage

12.3.2 Network-Attached Storage

12.3.3 Storage-Area Network

12.4 Disk Scheduling

12.4.1 FCFS Scheduling

12.4.2 SSTF Scheduling

12.4.3 SCAN Scheduling

12.4.4 C-SCAN Scheduling

12.4.5 LOOK Scheduling

12.4.6 Selection of a Disk-Scheduling Algorithm

12.5 Disk Management

12.5.1 Disk Formatting

12.5.2 Boot Block

12.5.3 Bad Blocks

12.6 Swap-Space Management

12.6.1 Swap-Space Use

12.6.2 Swap-Space Location

Swap space can be physically located in one of two locations:

12.6.3 Swap-Space Management: An Example

12.7 RAID Structure

12.7.1 Improvement of Reliability via Redundancy

12.7.2 Improvement in Performance via Parallelism

12.7.3 RAID Levels

12.7.4 Selecting a RAID Level

12.7.5 Extensions

12.7.6 Problems with RAID

12.8 Stable-Storage Implementation

12.9 Tertiary-Storage Structure

12.9.1 Tertiary-Storage Devices

12.9.1.1 Removable Disks

12.9.1.2 Tapes

12.9.1.3 Future Technology

12.9.2 Operating-System Support

12.9.2.1 Application Interface

12.9.2.2 File Naming

12.9.2.3 Hierarchical Storage Management

12.9.3 Performance Issues

12.9.3.1 Speed

12.9.3.1 Reliability

12.9.3.3 Cost

12.10 Summary