June 21, 2007: Seminar: Kartik Gopalan: "MemX: Supporting Large Memory Applications in Xen Virtual Machines"

Seminar Announcement


MemX: Supporting Large Memory Applications in Xen Virtual Machines

Kartik Gopalan
Department of Computer Science,
SUNY Binghamton
Wednesday, June 20, 2007

3:00 p.m., Room 1000 SEO


Abstract:

Modern data centers increasingly use virtual machines (VMs) to partition server resources and improve utilization efficiency. These VMs often need to support disk-bound and memory-intensive large dataset workloads, such as enterprise databases, data mining, and web services, which can strain the limited I/O and memory resources within a single VM. This talk will describe the design and implementation of a fully transparent distributed system in the Xen Virtual Machine environment called MemX, that coordinates the use of cluster-wide memory resources to support low-latency I/O operations. Applications using MemX do not require specialized APIs, libraries, recompilation, relinking, or dataset preparations. Performance evaluations in both virtualized and non-virtualized Linux shows that large dataset applications and multiple concurrent VMs achieve significant speedups using MemX compared against virtualized local and iSCSI disks. As a side benefit, live Xen VMs using MemX can migrate seamlessly without disrupting any running applications.

Brief Bio:

Kartik Gopalan is an Assistant Professor in Computer Science at the State University of New York at Binghamton. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Stony Brook University (2003), M.S. in Computer Science from Indian Institute of Technology at Chennai (1996), and B.E. in Computer Engineering from Delhi Institute of Technology (1994). His research interests lie in performance guarantees and resource virtualization in operating systems and networks.

Host: Professor Venkat Venkatakrishnan












































 
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