Undergraduate Programs
Bachelor of Science in CS
Human Centered Computing Concentration

Undergraduate Curricula

A substantial revision of the undergraduate curricula became active in Fall 2012.

Undergraduate Tutoring Program

The CS department offers peer tutoring services focused on 100 and 200 level classes.

For the current list of tutors and the tutoring schedule, click here.

Tutoring sessions are held in 2250 SELE.

Undergraduate Advising

All College of Engineering undergraduate students are required to be advised before they are able to register for classes each semester. Advising hold will not be removed until you are advised. Fall and Spring advising sign-up is the 9th week of the semester. Advising appointments are held during the 10th week.

Find your advisor from the advising list and make an appointment with your advisor directly during the 9th week. It is recommended that you bring your DARS report, list of courses you are interested in and any questions you have for your appointment. Once you are advised, fill out the advising form with your advisor and submit it to the CS Student Affairs office (SEO 905). Keep your white copy for your records. Staff in the office will remove your advising hold within 1-2 business days. Questions regarding advising can be directed to the CS Student Affairs Office, SEO 905. Phone: 312-413-4950/312-996-2290 or E-mail: ugrad@cs.uic.edu.


Spring 2016 Dates:

  • Sign-up: March 14-18, 2016
  • Advising: March 21-25, 2016

Information for Prospective Students (link)

Student Graduation Objectives (link)

Material Relating to the "Old" Curricula (active Fall 2007 -- Summer 2012)

The Human-Centered Computing Concentration emphasizes the knowledge and skills needed to begin a professional practice in areas such as: user-interface design and development for desktop or mobile devices; computer graphics and animation for video games, movie special effects; and scientific-, engineering- and medical visualization. The concentration continues to cover in depth the fundamental areas of computer science including programming, data structures, discrete mathematics, algorithms, formal languages, computer architecture, and operating systems. In addition the concentration focuses on key topics of human-centered computing practice such as user-interface design, computer graphics, visual media, and natural language processing.

Required for the Bachelor of Science in Computer Science,
Human Centered Computing Concentration (128 semester hours)

Required outside the College of Engineering (61 semester hours)

  • ENGL 160 – English Composition I (3 hrs)
  • ENGL 161 – English Composition II (3 hrs)

  • MATH 180 – Calculus I (5 hrs)
  • MATH 181 – Calculus II (5 hrs)
  • MATH 210 – Calculus III (3 hrs)

  • PHYS 141 – General Physics I (Mechanics) (4 hrs)
  • PHYS 142 – General Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism) (4 hrs)
  • Science electives (4 hrs)

  • General Education Core (15 hrs)
    • Exploring World Cultures (3 hrs)
    • Understanding the Creative Arts (3 hrs)
    • Understanding the Past (3 hrs)
    • Understanding the Individual and Society (3 hrs)
    • Understanding US Society (3 hrs)

  • Humanities/social sciences/art electives (15 hrs) At least three of the selected courses must be from the following list: (to enroll in these courses students will have to go to the respective departments to get an override on pre-requisites and/or enrollment restrictions.)
    • PSCH 100 – Introduction to Psychology (4 hrs)
    • PSCH 242 – Introduction to Research in Psychology (3 hrs) [Mandatory pre-requisite for PSCH 242 is PSCH 100]
    • AD 100 – Introduction to Responsive Arts (4 hrs)
    • AD 452 – Info Aesthetics I (4 hrs)
    • AD 454 – 3D Space I: Modelling (4 hrs)
    • AD 456 – Embedded Media: Physical Computing (4 hrs)
    • COMM 316 – Writing for Electronic Media (3 hrs)
    • COMM 430 – Media, Information, and Society (3 hrs)
    • COMM 460 – Visual Communication (3 hrs)

Required in the College of Engineering (50 semester hours)

  • Engr 100 – Orientation (0 hrs)
    Engr 100 carries one equivalent hour; does not carry credit towards graduation.
  • CS 101 – Introduction to Computing (3 hrs)
  • CS 102 – Introduction to Programming (3 hrs)
  • CS 201 – Data Structures and Discrete Mathematics I (4 hrs)
  • CS 202 – Data Structures and Discrete Mathematics II (3 hrs)
  • CS 266 – Computer Architecture I: Logic and Computer Structures (4 hrs)
  • CS 301 – Languages and Automata (3 hrs)
  • CS 335 – Computer Ethics (2 hrs)
  • CS 340 – Software Design (4 hrs)
  • CS 366 – Computer Architecture II: Hardware-Software Interface (4 hrs)
  • CS 376 – Practicum in Computer Science Oral Presentations (1 hr)
  • CS 385 – Operating Systems Concepts and Design (4 hrs)
  • CS 401 – Computer Algorithms I (3 hrs)
  • CS 422 – User Interface Design and Programming (3 hrs)
  • CS 499 – Professional Development Seminar (0 hrs)
At least three courses from among the following:
  • CS 415 – Computer Vision I (3 hrs)
  • ECE 415 – Image Analysis and Computer Vision I (3 hrs)
  • CS 411 – Artificial Intelligence I (3 hrs)
  • CS 421 – Natural Language Processing (3 hrs)
  • CS 424 – Visualization and Visual Analytics (3 hrs)
  • CS 426 – Video Game Design and Development (3 hrs)
  • CS 488 – Computer Graphics I (3 hrs)

Technical Electives (3 semester hours)

Students must complete at least three hours of courses from among the following list of courses. CS 411, CS 415, ECE 415, CS 421, CS 424, CS 426 and CS 488 may be used as either a selective course (above) or a technical elective but not both.

  • CS 398 – Undergraduate Design/Research (3 hrs)
  • CS 411 – Artificial Intelligence (3 hrs)
  • CS 415 – Computer Vision I (3 hrs)
  • ECE 415 – Image Analysis (3 hrs)
  • CS 421 – Natural Language Processing (3 hrs)
  • CS 424 – Visualization and Visual Analytics (3 hrs)
  • CS 426 – Video Game Design and Development (3 hrs)
  • CS 441 – Distributed Object Programming Using Middleware (3 hrs)
  • CS 450 – Introduction to Networking (3 hrs)
  • CS 455 – Design and Implementation of Network Protocols (3 hrs)
  • CS 466 – Advanced Computer Architecture (3 hrs)
  • CS 469 – Computer Systems Design (3 hrs)
  • CS 473 – Compiler Design (3 hrs)
  • CS 474 – Object-Oriented Languages and Environments (3 hrs)
  • CS 476 – Programming Language Design (3 hrs)
  • CS 480 – Database Systems (3 hrs)
  • CS 485 – Networked Operating Systems Programming (4 hrs)
  • CS 488 – Computer Graphics I (3 hrs)
  • ECE 452 – Robotics: Algorithms and Control (3 hrs)
  • MCS 320 – Introduction to Symbolic Computation (3 hrs)
  • MCS 471 – Numerical Analysis (3 hrs)
  • MCS 481 – Computational Geometry (3 hrs)
  • Stat 471 – Linear and Non-Linear Programming (3 hrs)
  • MATH 419 – Design and Implementation of Network Protocols (3 hrs)

Required Mathematics Courses (9 semester hours)

  • One of the following two courses must be chosen:
    • IE 342a – Probability and Statistics for Engineers (3 hrs)
    • STAT 381 – Applied Statistical Methods (3 hrs)

  • One of the following two courses must be chosen
    • Math 310 – Applied Linear Algebra (3 hrs)
    • Math 320 – Linear Algebra I (3 hrs)
  • Required
    • Math 220 – Introcuction to Differential Equations (3 hrs)
(a) Students who take IE 342 will not receive credit for either Stat 381 or Stat 401.

Lab Science Sequence and Science Electives (4 semester hours)

Every student must take a total of at least 4 additional credit hours in the science area to make up a total of 12 credits. Additional courses may be other courses on this list, courses that have Phys 141, Phys 142 or any of these courses as prerequisites, or other courses from a list maintained by the Computer Science Department of certain additional courses in Engineering, and quantitative social sciences.

Four total hours from among the following list of courses

  • BioS 100 – Biology of Cells and Organisms (5 hrs)
  • BioS 101 – Biology of Populations and Communities (5 hrs)
  • Chem 112 – General Chemistry I (5 hrs)
  • Chem 114 – General Chemistry II (5 hrs)
  • Chem 116 – Honors General Chemistry I (5 hrs)
  • Chem 118 – Honors General Chemistry II (5 hrs)
  • EaES 101 – Global Environmental Change (4 hrs)
  • EaES 111 – Earth, Energy, and the Environment (4 hrs)

Free Electives (5 semester hours)

Every student has five free elective hours.


Typical Schedule for the Computer Science Major, Human Centered Computing Concentration



FIRST YEAR

Fall semester - 17 hrs

CS 101 – Introduction to Computing (3)
Math 180 – Calculus I (5)
Engl 160 – English Composition I (3)
General Education Core courses (6)
Engr 100 – Orientation (1 hr, 0 credits)
Spring semester - 15 hrs

CS 102 – Introduction to Programming (3)
Math 181 – Calculus II (5)
Science Elective (4)
Engl 161 – English Composition II (3)




SECOND YEAR

Fall semester - 17 hrs

CS 201 – Discrete Math/Data Structures I (4)
Math 210 – Calculus III (3)
PHYS 141 – General Physics I (4)
Humanities/social science/arts elective (3)
General Education Core course (3)
Spring semester - 16 hrs

MATH 310 or Math 320 (3)
CS 202 – Discrete Math/Data Structures II (3)
PHYS 142 – General Physics II
General Education Core course (6)




THIRD YEAR

Fall semester - 17 hrs

CS 266 – Computer Architecture I (4)
CS 301 – Languages and Automata (3)
IE 342 or Stat 381 or STAT 401 (3)
CS 340 – Software Design (4)
CS 401 – Computer Algorithms I (3)

Spring semester - 17-18 hrs

CS 366 – Computer Architecture II (4)
CS 385 – Operating Systems Concepts (4)
Math 220 – Differential Equations (3)
Humanities/social science/art (3-4)
CS 422 – User Interface Design (3)




FOURTH YEAR

Fall semester - 16-17 hrs

CS 376 – Practicum in Oral Presentations (1)
CS 411 or CS 424 or CS 488 (3)
CS 415 or ECE 415 (3)
Technical elective (3)
Humanities/social science/art (3-4)
Spring semester - 13-14 hrs

CS 335 – Computer Ethics (2)
CS 499 – Professional Development Seminar (0)
CS 426 or CS 421 (3)
Free Electives (5)
Humanities/social science/art (3-4)

Faculty Contacts

If you have questions about the Human Centered Computing Concentration, please contact one of the following faculty members

Barbara Di Eugenio, Professor
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1993
Natural language processing, intelligent agents, collaborative and tutoring systems
email - web - 916 SEO - 312.996.7566
Andrew Johnson, Associate Professor, Director of Research/EVL
Ph.D., Wayne State University, 1994
Computer graphics, collaborative environments, visualization, virtual reality, learning environments, user interfaces, visual analytics
email - web - 2032 ERF - 312.996.3002
Jason Leigh, Professor
Ph.D., University of Illinois at Chicago, 1998
Amplified collaboration environments, advanced networking, realtime computer Graphics, virtual Reality, video game design and development
email - web - 2032 ERF - 312.996.3002
Robert Kenyon, Professor, Director of graduate studies
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1978
Human-Computer interaction, computer graphics
email - web - 1133 SEO - 312.996.0450
Leilah Lyons, Associate Professor
Ph.D., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 2008
Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL), Interactive Museum Exhibit Design
email - web - 918 SEO -
Tom Moher, Associate Professor Emeritus
Ph.D., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, 1983
Learning Environments, human-computer interaction
email - web - 3009 ERF - 312.996.4562
Luc Renambot, Associate Research Professor
Ph.D., Université de Rennes, 2000
Tele-immersion, visualization, advanced networking
email - web - 2032 ERF - 312.996.3002
 
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